Lost: A Show About Science or A Show About Faith? – Thoughts on the END of Lost’s Series Finale “The End”

Last night, I wrote a blog entry, in which I discussed some of the lighter aspects of Lost‘s generally feel-good Series Finale, “The End.”  In it, I, more or less, completely refrained from discussing the show’s controversial ending, and promised to tackle that issue exclusively in another post.  Well, I’M BAAACK . . .

One Man of Science.  One Man of Faith.  The Island wasn’t big enough for both of them . . .  or was it?

In the last season of Lost, there was much talk and broohaha about this image, and all the ideas it represents . . .

Light versus Dark.  Black versus White.  Good versus Evil.  Heaven versus Hell.  And while that dichotomy was certainly central to the battle between Jacob and the Man in Black . . .

 . . . our Losties, for the most part, resided somewhere in between.  Much like the rest of us non-television characters, their morality was covered in shades of grey.   For them (and for us), the REAL battle for control of Lost island was one that was a lot less clear cut, making it a lot less certain who we should root for.  And, ultimately,  it was this battle, that took center stage during the final half of the Season finale. (After they, you know, got rid of that pesky Black Smoke thing  . . .)

Jack v. Locke – The Man of Science versus The Man of Faith

Although Lost undoubtedly featured many characters and their respective stories of redemption, at its core were the journeys of two men.  When we first meet Jack Shepard, he is the quintessential Man of Science.  He’s a surgeon, and about as left-brained as a person can get.  There is not a creative or artistic bone in this man’s body.  So, understandably, when it comes to matters of faith or destiny, he’s a complete Doubting Thomas.  For him, if an explanation doesn’t appear in a medical reference book, it just plain doesn’t exist.

John Locke, on the other hand, is a fly-by-the-seat-of-his-pants, Man of Faith, guy.  He’s Mister “Nobody tells me what I can and can’t do.”  A guy who sees absolutely nothing wrong with signing up for a “walkabout,” despite being completely incapable of “walking about.”  Upon crashing on the island, he suddenly regains use of his legs, and, thereafter, becomes convinced that the Island is his Destiny.  He is absolutely certain that some higher power has brought him to the Island; and that he is, therefore, meant to remain and do great things there . . .

For the first Four Seasons of Lost, pretty much up until Locke’s “death,” we watched these two men battle it out with one another, arguing for the righteousness of their respective ideologies.  Neither man would budge an inch with respect to his position.  However, upon REAL Locke’s death, at the end of Season 4, things change for Jack Shepard.  During the last two seasons of the show,  Jack slowly evolved from a Man of Science into a Man of Faith. 

First, after escaping the Island as part of the Oceanic Six, he returns to it, believing he is meant to rescue the others who remained thereon.  In Season 6, when the Losties are once again ready to escape the island, this time on a boat, Jack jumps ship, convinced that the island “isn’t done with [him] yet.  Then, in the penultimate episode of the show, Jack LITERALLY drinks Jacob’s Kool Aid, and agrees to remain on the island, throwing away his promising surgical career in order to “protect” what, for all intents and purposes, was a Giant Lightbulb . . .

Scientific Answers versus Mystical Answers  – The SHOW About Science versus The SHOW About Faith

When it really came down to it, I think Lost‘s journey as a show, was similar to Jack’s journey, as a character.  Lost started out as a Show About Science (Science Fiction, perhaps, but, science, nonetheless).  In the show’s early seasons, many of the Island’s mysteries were explained through quasi-scientific means.  Flight 815 was initially thought to have been brought down, as a result of the Island’s unique electromagnetic properties, which were inherent to the Island’s location, but were also exacerbated by a Hydrogen Bomb buried beneath its surface . . .  These electromagnetic qualities also allowed the Island itself, and its inhabitants, to move freely through the time/space barrier and . . .  basically . . . time travel.

Those all important numbers, which Hurley chose in order to win the lottery, and which Desmond was forced to repeatedly punch into a computer screen to prevent the Island’s destruction . . .

Were part of the Valenzetti Equation, derived by members of the Dharma Initiative, to determine the exact point in time at which all human life would cease to exist.  The Dharma initiative itself was, more or less, a scientific research group, which took advanage of the island’s unique electromagnetic properties in order to experiment with various facets of human life, from a woman’s ability to give birth . . .

 . . . to psychology, subliminal messaging, and mind control . . .

Then, Season 6 came around, and like Jack Shepard, Lost had to go and get all “Faith-y” on us.  Island mysteries, like “why the plane crashed,” which had once been explained by science, were now explained as being part of the “Master Plan,” in a battle between the God-like Jacob . . .

 . . . and the Devil-like Man in Black . . .

 . . . for control of the Island, and, by extension, the souls of its inhabitants . . .

Supernatural, and biblical-type reasoning was now used to explain Island mysteries such as why MIB couldn’t escape the Island, why Richard Alpert wouldn’t age . . .

 . . . why Jacob and MIB couldn’t kill one another, how Locke became Flocke . . .

 . . . and who Adam and Eve were . . .

The Last Ten Minutes of the Finale Episode of Lost – Flash Sideways of Science (Time Travel) versus Flash Sideways of Faith (Purgatory)

So, I guess, it shouldn’t really have surprised me (but it DID!), that the final Lost mystery, the reason behind the Flash Sideways, ended up being a faith-based reason (preparation for the afterlife / purgatory) . . .

 . . . as opposed to a science-based reason (an alternate universe created as a result of Juliet’s detonation of the hydrogen bomb at the end of Season 5).

And, I have to say, that the fact that this promo picture, released just before Season 6 began, didn’t give the religious implications of the finale away to me, makes me more than a bit mad at myself . . .

I guess, when it really comes down to it, how you felt about Lost’s final moments (MULTITUDE of unanswered questions notwithstanding), really comes down to which side of the Man of Science / Man of Faith debate YOU fall under.  Me, personally?  I’m a bit more of a “science” girl.  So, I was a little disappointed that the Flash Sideways World did not, in fact, end up being the hydrogen bomb-created alternate universe I had initially envisioned. 

Plus, Flash Sideways World just seemed so PERFECT!   And because I’d truly grown to love these characters, having spent six years with them, I really wanted this world to exist FOR THEM!  Because, without it . . .

Ji Yeon would REALLY be an orphan . . .

David Shepard would COMPLETELY cease to exist . . . Oh, and most of the Losties would already be DEAD!

 . . . including THIS GUY!

But, putting my personal feelings aside, the fact that the Flash Sideways World ended up being purgatory makes sense, BECAUSE everything was so perfect there.  In essence, Flash Sideways World gave our main Losties the oppportunity to redeem themselves from wrongs they felt they had committed during their actual lifetimes .  . .

Jack Shepard had a bad relationship with his father, who degraded his worth constantly, and always chose his work over him, so in Flash Sideways World Purgatory he was a supportive and understanding father to his son . . .

During his lifetime, Sawyer was a con artist, who shunned justice.  So, in purgatory, he was a detective, who fought hard to protect it.

Sorry! I know technically I should have found a “cop uniform” pic of Sawyer, but I just couldn’t help myself . . .

On the island, Kate unknowingly abandoned Claire, and ended up raising her child, Aaron.  But in Purgatory, she guides Claire through the birthing process, and allows her to raise her own baby . . . And, as for Claire, she gets to keep her kid, and not become a skanky haired wackadoo.  YAY!

In the real world, Sayid’s murderous lifestyle resulted in the death of the love of his life, Nadia.

In Purgatory, he lets his brother marry Nadia instead, and, in doing so, probably spares her life.

In the real world, Desmond loved Penny Widmore, but her father’s disapproval of him kept the two of them apart.  In Purgatory, Desmond works for Charles Widmore, and has gained his utmost trust and respect . . .

In Purgatory, Hurley isn’t a loveable loser who won the lottery and STILL can’t accomplish anything.  He’s a loveable WINNER, who get’s the girl and is rich enough to employ the ENTIRE CAST OF LOST!

Purgatory Ben is a kindly history teacher who saves Alex’s future, by sacrificing his own personal success to ensure her entrance into an Ivy League college, instead of . . . you know . . . GETTING HER KILLED!  And Purgatory Locke is a pretty nice guy too, and Ben’s BFF to boot!

And, as I mentioned before, Jin and Sun, actually get to raise their kid Purgatory World.  Plus, they successfully ditch Sun’s Asshat Dad.

Matthew Fox probably explained the whole “purgatory thing”  best, in his post-finale interview with Jimmy Kimmel, when he said something to the effect of: “There’s a school of thought that, after you die, you go to a sort of ‘waiting place’ in which you encounter everyone who was important in your life.  Once you have reunited with, and reconciled with, these people, you can truly accept your own mortality and . . . move on.”  (And you just KNOW Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse fed him those words, because Matthew Fox may be smart, but not THAT smart!)

I’ll have to admit that when Christian Shepard (and if THAT’S not a “Man of Faith” name, I don’t know what is) . . .

 . . . . appeared in that Non-Denominational (or, rather, ALL Denominational) Church / Temple, OUTSIDE of his own coffin, and replied to Jack’s question of “How did you get here?  Aren’t you dead?” with . . .

 “How did YOU get here?”  . . .

I screamed at the television . . .

“YOU PROMISED THEY WEREN’T DEAD THIS WHOLE TIME, J.J. ABRAMS!  YOU LIAR!  I JUST WASTED SIX YEARS OF MY LIFE FOR YOU!”

But then, when Christian explained that, “Everything that happened on the Island was real . . . Everyone dies eventually . . . Some of these people died before you, some long after you .  . .” I calmed down a bit . . .

And in the penultimate scene of the show, when Jack stumbles out from the cave, lays down on the ground next to doggie Vincent, watches his fellow Losties successfully escape the Island on a plane, and, subsequently, CLOSES his eyes in death, just as he had opened them so many times during the LIFE of the show, I thought to myself, “What an appropriate ending . . .”

But then they HAD to show me this . . .

While the producers didn’t go as far as I feared they would, by showing me a heap of dead bodies lying amongst the wreckage, they showed me enough to make me wonder if I was being f**ked with.  And I couldn’t help but be reminded of ANOTHER intriguing, but unnerving, Open-Ended Series Finale that left me with more questions than answers . . .

(Special thanks to njean666 for this fabulous clip)

They never make it easy for us, do they?

6 Comments

Filed under Lost

6 responses to “Lost: A Show About Science or A Show About Faith? – Thoughts on the END of Lost’s Series Finale “The End”

  1. imaginarymen

    So I think I told you I cheated and 1. Stopped watching a couple of seasons ago 2. Watched the first 10 minutes and last half hour of the finale and 3. Watched half of Kimmel ;-p

    But that is all fine bc you did such an AWESOME job of explaining it! I totally did not even make the connection that the plane Jack saw fly over bf he died was the one w/ the other Losties getting off the island!

    I also wish I had put money down on Vincent, bc chatting w/ a friend while watching I said “What the hell happened to that dog??” and then, there he was.

    And of course – I love any post that includes a shirtless Sawyer and Our Boy Ian!!

    Nice job – as always!

    • Awww, thanks so much Amy! That really means a lot!

      To be honest, I often don’t feel equipped to write about Lost, given all the crazy hardcore fans who practically have a Doctorate in the subject. So, the fact that I was able to adequately express myself on the episode, so that you, a former watcher, could understand what I was talking about, is pretty cool. 🙂

      I really liked the “fly over” scene because it was so poignant, and seemed to confirm that life in the Island world DID exist for six seasons, and that the Losties were DEFINITELY not dead the whole time . . . Then Abrams had to go screw it up by showing that ambiguous wreckage scene! Poopy head!

      See, YOU would have put your money on Vincent, and won. I would have put my money on the return of Walt, the “Hurley bird,” and the “polar bear” and LOST big time! So, I’m really glad, for my wallet’s sake, that I am not a betting woman.

      Yes, this was an unusually and uncharacteristically “intellectual” and “serious” post for me. If it didn’t have at least one Shirtless Sawyer or Sexy Ian pic in it, I would honestly wonder whether someone else had hacked into my account and wrote it. 🙂

  2. So, I was just lurking around the Entertainment Weekly online website, and came across this gem, regarding that controversial final image of the Flight 815 wreckage used to close out six seasons of Lost . . .

    http://popwatch.ew.com/2010/05/26/lost-final-scenes-wreckage/

    Seriously, ABC?

    I’m not sure I buy this . . . Since when do television networks have THAT much control over programming content? Particularly content of THAT much importance to the overall legacy of television series.

    Something smells rotten in TV land . .

  3. this is a good write up! i’m still not sure what to make of the ending (i’ll have to watch it again) but the more i think about it, the more i like how open it was to interpretation. it pretty much allows you to think whatever you want (for example: Jack’s dad says that everything that happened happened. i’m going to take that to mean that the flash-sideways was real, or at least had a real impact on the characters).
    oh and i agree with you about the wreckage at the end. when the episode aired i thought that they were using that old TV trope of showing the set from season 1:
    http://thecomicscomic.typepad.com/thecomicscomic/2009/12/cliche-sitcom-goodbyes-empty-rooms-boxes-and-furniture-oh-bye.html
    but then i read some interesting theories about it & i kinda liked them. i don’t think these theories are necessarily wrong because the wreckage shots weren’t part of the show, they showed it after all.

    • Hey, Lola! Thanks so much for the clip! Awww, poor sad, Mr. Feeney from Boy Meets World, “I loved you all!” (I’m getting a little teary now.)

      I guess if you put it that way, it makes sense that the series would end how it began. But, why couldn’t they just have ended with Jack’s eyes closing? Wouldn’t that have the same “we’ve come full circle” effect, without effing everything up?

      I just didn’t really buy ABC’s explanation that they included the shot to “calm down fans and transition them into watching the news.” Last I checked, massive plane crashes weren’t calming AT ALL! Plus, I don’t even remember there being “news” after Lost! I just remember the entirely Lost-themed Jimmy Kimmel, which wouldn’t have required ANY transition at all . . . Then again, perhaps The Others have altered my consciousness ;).

      I REALLY like your idea that Christian Shepard’s statement that “everything happened” included the flash sideways too. Because I REALLY liked Flash Sideways world, and was bummed that it didn’t “exist,” in the way you and I “exist.”

      Your theory would also clear up the “timeline” discrepancy of purgatory. Namely, if everyone died at different times, how did they all end up in the church at the SAME time? Perhaps the scenario played out over and over again for each of them?

      The other purgatory discrepancy was Juliet’s death back in Season 5, when she said those lines about “going out for coffee” with Sawyer, that she eventually repeated in the finale. If the characters were supposed to spend some TIME in purgatory post-death, before being ready to move on. How come SHE was ready to move on instantly? What happened, for example, to her scenes before that, with Sun and Jin?

      I better stop before my head explodes . . .

      Thanks for the link, and your insightful comments, and for giving me hope that Flash Sideways World is REAL! 🙂

  4. Pingback: Missing Your Favorite TV Shows This Summer? No Problem! Just Watch Other People Make Fun of Them on YouTube! « TV Recappers Anonymous

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